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Using HeartCode®, Hospital Improves ROSC Rate by 16% and Saves $400K

  
  
  

This blog post details one of many successes we have identified for customers using our solutions. Learn about more customer successes here.

By adopting the American Association HeartCode® program, Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas:

  • Increased staff confidence and competence in delivering
    high-quality CPR - ultimately resulting in an improvement in the rate of return
    in spontaneous circulation (ROSC) by 16% over four years
  • Reduced time staff spent in classroom training by nearly 50%
  • Saved an average of $75,000 per year and more than $400,000 in the
    four years of using HeartCode 

Watch a Video about this Customer Success.

HeartCode Resuscitation Training from HealthStreamFor more than sixty years, Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas has been dedicated to providing quality health services in a Christian environment.  Baptist Hospitals of Southeast Texas is a
not-for-profit, community-owned healthcare facility with 508 beds and over 700 licensed nurses. It has been a Magnet® designated facility since 2007and it is the only Chest Pain Certified facility in Southeast Texas.

Baptist started using HealthStream in 2005 and adopted HeartCode in 2008. Even though the hospital was content with the classroom method of CPR training, hospital leadership saw the opportunity to improve CPR training with evidence based practice by adopting Basic Life Support (BLS) and Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS).

After adopting HeartCode, Baptist was able to overcome the challenges of adopting a new way of conducting CPR training and successfully implement the program across their facility.  They also improved the quality of CPR and resulted in significant cost savings.

Read the full success story.

Fill out the information at this link to learn more about HeartCode. 

Performance Recognition for Healthcare Staff Must Be Meaningful

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience Best Practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

Meaningful recognition is tied intrinsically to the organization’s mission, vision and values. When employees see that their actions have impacted one of these driving principles, they are motivated to repeat the behavior again and again. But it is also important to research how people wish to be rewarded, what is meaningful to them.

Why Recognize Excellent Performance?

Recognizing an employee for work that advances the organization’s mission, vision or values promotes a culture of high performance. So does honoring employees who have demonstrated the characteristics and behaviors that the organization holds in high regard. If leaders consistently reward employees by tying the recognition to one of the organization’s driving
principles – a process known as “connecting the dots” - think of the difference it would make! People would be encouraged and motivated to repeat that positive behavior again and again, knowing its impact.

describe the imageMaking Rewards and Recognition Meaningful

Yet, the praise still has to be meaningful to them as individuals, which ties back to their personality or qualities. Reward and recognition, after all, is about focusing on the good things that a person does, instead of concentrating only on organizational areas of improvement.

An Example of Meaningful Recognition

For example, praising an employee for an innovation that saved the organization some money is the thing to do. But think how much more meaningful it would be if the recognition went something like this: “John’s ability to see the big picture made him question why so much money is being spent on that item. His clever thinking resulted in a new way of doing things that is a lot more cost effective. He’s a true innovator!” You are not only pointing out how John helped the organization, but how his particular talents were key to the process. It has much more significance.

Consider that it is sometimes the “behind the scenes” employees who make the most difference to our customers. It could be something so simple as how food is placed on a tray, turning out an overhead light that is bothersome, or cleaning up a mess with a positive attitude.

Connect Recognition to Service Excellence and Outcomes

Recognize the individuals who perform those tasks, but do it in a way that connects their
caring actions to service excellence. This reinforces the behaviors that will in turn positively impact patient satisfaction surveys.

It may take some extra time for a leader to think about and create meaningful personalized feedback and praise for a job well done, connecting the behavior to the organization as well. But it will pay off in the long run. Recognition that values people for who they are has the power to energize; it can change the corporate culture and result in even more motivated employees. What a return on the leader’s investment of time!  

“People want to feel what they do makes a difference.”

—Frances Hesselbein, President, The Drucker Foundation

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

 

Implement Evidence-Based Competency Assessments for Post-Acute Care

  
  
  

By Linda Hollinger-Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN; Vice President, Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging

Why all the buzz about evidence-based competency assessment for health care professionals?  As managers, we all like to think we have processes in place to hire the best and brightest staff. Typical processes in place include: 

  • Collecting and screening applicants’ resumes
  • Various levels of job interviews including one-on-one and group meetings
  • Written assessments or testing
  • Obtaining background checks and references 

Post-Acute Care Training and Competency Assessment A great deal of time and effort is put into place to recruit and onboard qualified staff as well as complete annual performance evaluations in a timely fashion. Replacing staff who later leave the organization can be costly. For example, it has been estimated that the cost of replacing one nurse is equivalent to about twice the nurse’s annual salary. This does not take into account the potential negative impact on the quality of care, productivity, and customer and employee satisfaction as a result of staff turnover.  

Although there are numerous reasons why staff may leave an organization, addressing their needs for growth and development, clarity of expectations, and ongoing performance feedback are important keys to retention. Developing and implementing an evidence-based competency assessment program can be a significant mechanism to promote ongoing learning and achieve effective continuous quality improvement outcomes. 

Register for a free webinar about Creating Competency Programs for Post-Acute Care.

What Makes Evidence-Based Competency Assessment Different? 

With my experience as an educator and clinician, I have worked with a number of competency models over the years. Most of these models tend to be “task-oriented” and “process focused” with evaluation components emphasizing technical skills. There is very little leverage to customize and match performance levels based on specific job requirements and individual abilities. To that end, annual performance evaluations failed to address quality improvement or specific learning needs of the employee.  

With the growing complexities of healthcare and increased focus on accountability and quality, I found that evaluating competent practices in both my students and clinical staff required an outcomes-based model for ongoing competency assessment targeting the learner rather than on the task at hand.    

What makes evidence-based competency assessment different is that review mechanisms focus on what the staff can do (e.g., the behavior) rather than solely on what they know in order to complete a task. Evidence-based competency assessment takes into account not just understanding and performing technical skills, but also requires integrating critical thinking, interpersonal skills, and ability to adapt to change in the environment. Staff need to be prepared for what I would term the “what if” situations – what if my patient does not respond to my treatment or what if there is some complication from the procedure? 

Another difference is the focus on “best evidence” approach to health care delivery. There is a great deal of research supporting the importance of evidence-based practice on achieving successful patient outcomes. More and more, I am seeing evidence-based practice becoming the expectation among health care educators and professionals across various settings. We are moving away from the “well, that’s how we’ve always done it!” attitude.     

Evidence-Based Competency Assessment is Ongoing 

Organizations that fully embrace evidence-based competency assessment integrate these processes into all phases of employment from hiring to onboarding to annual performance evaluation. The organization should start with identifying competencies required and recommended for each particular position.  

A good starting point is to review recommended competencies published from a number of national professional organizations, particularly as these are based on best evidence.  For example, the American Association of Colleges of Nursing published the “Recommended Baccalaureate Competencies and Curricular Guidelines for the Nursing Care of Older Adults”
(September 2010).  For each job classification, limit the list of competencies to no more than 9-12 that would distinguish your top performers. Competencies may then be ranked as to degree of importance for that position.  

During onboarding, the new employee’s performance is evaluated according to the competencies at specific points such as in the first six to eight months and then annually. Competency assessment should also be dynamic to encourage new learning and demonstrate a constructive approach to developing skills in technical aspects of the position, critical thinking, interpersonal skills, and abilities to adapt to change.  

Having an evidence-based competency assessment system in place also is an opportunity for the annual performance evaluation to be a more dynamic experience for both the staff and manager.  Evidence of competencies attained goes well beyond the typical evaluation form that indicates a task or skill was “completed” or not.  In the competency assessment system, the staff member is encouraged to seek out evidence to verify stages of competencies. In addition to a self-assessment, evidence may include: (1) peer reviews; (2) case studies; (3) QI monitors; (4) presentations; and (5) return demonstrations.  

The time is now for health care organizations to take to heart the important role evidence-based competency assessment plays in improving the delivery of high quality care to our clients!

Register for a free webinar about Creating Competency Programs for Post-Acute Care.

About the Author

Linda Hollinger-Smith, PhD, RN, FAAN – Vice President 

Linda Hollinger-Smith, Mather Lifeways Institute on AgingDr. Hollinger-Smith is a doctorally prepared registered nurse focusing her research in gerontology, workforce development, and quality improvement. She has more than 28 years of experience working with older adults in senior living, long-term care settings, in the community, and in acute care settings in various staff and managerial positions. Her past positions include Assistant Dean of the Rush University College of Nursing, Nursing Director of the Rush Primary Care Institute, and Associate Chairperson of the Department of Adult Health Nursing at Rush University College of Nursing.  She completed a doctorate degree in gerontology from the University of Illinois at Chicago and is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing. She also holds faculty appointments at both Rush University Medical Center and the University of Illinois.

She has served as Principal Investigator for multiple national research projects, targeting nursing workforce development and retention, falls reduction, and caregiver support issues. She has published over 60 journal articles, book chapters and research abstracts and has presented on national and international levels on various topics related to aging. In her current position, Dr. Hollinger-Smith leads a team of applied researchers and staff responsible for developing and expanding the Mather LifeWays applied research agenda. Her expertise areas include:

  • Workforce development and retention
  • Senior living trends
  • Satisfaction and market surveys
  • Gerontological nursing education
  • Caregiver support and resource
         programs
  • Resilience and older adults

Learn about HealthStream's solutions for Post-Acute Care.

The Importance of Sincere Rewards and Recognition in Healthcare

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience Best Practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

SINCEREHealthcare Reward and Recognition Training

A reward should reflect a genuine expression of appreciation. Insincerity is easily perceived when the words and body language are inadequate. Moreover, because the recognition comes across as shallow, it’s ineffective. The process of reward and recognition
should never be viewed as a chore.

A tried and true way to express sincere recognition is to be specific. Don’t just tell employees
that they did a good job – instead, be specific about what was good. If you don’t put thought into the recognition that you are giving, tying it specifically to the individual’s deserving behavior, the effect may be the opposite of what you intended. Offer detailed and relevant praise.

Examples of Sincere Praise Statements

Reconsider saying: “Great job on the report.” 

Better way to say it: “Your careful attention to detail made your report excellent. The facts were clear and the material was error-free. Great job!” 

Reconsider saying: “We should all thank John for his great teamwork.”

Better way to say it: “John, you consistently go the extra mile when you are involved in a project. Without your commitment to obtaining the information we needed, and staying on task, the team would have been unable to complete the project on time. On behalf of the team - thank you, John.” 

Reconsider saying: “You did a good job with the Communication Boards.”

Better way to say it: “That you put quality into everything you do is obvious when I look at our Communication Board. The material is  so well organized and colorful. You worked hard to make it appealing and draw everyone’s attention. Good job!”

Ways to Rethink How You Express Compliments about Work Performance

Being sincere with praise requires some forethought, obviously. It calls for leaders to be proactive in looking and listening. Look for reward and recognition opportunities by focusing on what makes your department excel. Is it teamwork, cooperation, hands-on patient care, fiscal watchfulness? Who can you recognize for their efforts to make the department shine?

Listen to the employees with whom you work. Are they praising someone for a job well-done,
talking about an individual who went the extra mile? Let your employees help identify your means of sincerity in recognizing individuals.

Starter Phrases for a New Way to Talk to High-Performing Employees

Here are some phrases of sincerity that ring true. Embellish them by adding the specifics of the employee’s behavior.

  • Your dedication contributes to our success by...
  • The service that you provided exceeded expectations when...
  • We recognize and sincerely appreciate your efforts that...
  • You took the time, and that made all the difference when...
  • You consistently go the extra mile by...
  • Your careful attention to detail contributed to the project’s success by...
  • You have a winner’s attitude that is demonstrated by...
  • That you put quality into everything you do is obvious when....
  • Your ability to listen carefully to what others are saying creates....
  • Your commitment to service excellence inspires others when...

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

Five Questions You Should Ask About Your Healthcare Workforce

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article in the inaugural issue of HealthStream's Healthcare Workforce Advisor, our quarterly magazine designed to bring you thought leadership and best practices for developing the healthcare workforce.

Developing a workforce involves strategic planning and dedicated resources to create desired business and clinical outcomes. Given the issues faced by healthcare organizations today, a wide range of solutions is necessary to address their vast workforce development needs. Where do you begin? First, it is important to identify the challenges that are specific to your organization in order to determine what resources will best meet your needs. Knowledge is power, and HealthStream has developed the tools and partnerships necessary to assess where you are and to develop a plan to achieve your desired outcomes. Here are the questions you should ask yourself about your workforce.

Is Your Workforce Qualified?HealthStream Healthcare Workforce Advisor

In healthcare, being qualified means your people have valid licenses, maintain current certifications, keep upwith continuing education requirements, and have the knowledge, judgment, and demeanor to do their jobs.

Is Your Workforce Competent?

Competency means that your staff is able to effectively apply knowledge, skills, and judgment in real-world settings for desirable outcomes. In healthcare, a desirable outcome may be the difference between life and death, making competency essential to all care-providing organizations.

Is Your Workforce Engaged?

Being engaged means staff members feel connected to their work and organization, they are inspired by shared values to do their best work, and they stay with the organization while encouraging others to join. Highly engaged employees are more productive and more likely to continue working for you, even through challenging times.

Is Your Workforce Performing?

A highly performing workforce achieves desired results for their roles every day. Performance requires qualified, competent, and engaged people to show up and get things done correctly and consistently. Done correctly, the performance evaluation process will be a highly valuable and respected part of your culture.

Is Your Workforce Developing?

Developing your people means identifying the needs, strengths, and weaknesses of your team and applying resources to close the gaps, ensuring you have the next generation of leaders ready. Without a targeted staff development program, your organization will fail to realize the full value of your most valuable resource: your people. 

The full article discusses each of these attributes of a successful workforce and the kinds of tools healthcare organizations can use to make them a reality. Complete the form below to download this issue of Healthcare Workforce Advisor.

Subscribe to Healthcare Workforce Advisor.

Five Essential Attributes of Reward and Recognition in Healthcare

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience Best Practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

Reward and recognition are critical to an employee’s success and work performance. They generate extraordinary commitment, ownership and loyalty from staff. Over the years at the BLG, we have learned to “sharpen the saw” when it comes to employee acknowledgment. We recommend five, very basic tenets that to which everyone in an organization should adhere to: the practice of SMART reward and recognition.

SMART = Sincere, Meaningful, Adaptable, Relevant, Timely

SINCEREBLG Healthcare Reward and Recognition Training

A reward should reflect a genuine expression of appreciation. Insincerity is easily perceived when the words and body language are inadequate. Moreover, because the recognition comes across as shallow, it’s ineffective. The process of reward and recognition should never be viewed as a chore.  

MEANINGFUL 

Meaningful recognition is tied intrinsically to the organization’s mission, vision and values. When employees see that their actions have impacted one of these driving principles, they are motivated to repeat the behavior again and again. But it is also important to research how people wish to be rewarded, what is meaningful to them.

ADAPTABLE

One of the most recognizable influences in today’s workplace environment is diversity. A recognition program therefore should embrace creative options to reward all involved and to keep the initiative from going stale.

RELEVANT

Match the reward to the person! Utilizing a method of recognition that ignores a person’s preferences, or even worse, that s disliked is self-defeating to the program’s goals.

TIMELY

It is important that a reward addresses the behavior romptly that it is intended to reinforce. Otherwise, if too much time passes, the recognition may be devalued. 

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

Hospice CAHPS: Are You Ready? Six Ways to Know

  
  
  

By Karen Sorensen, Associate Vice President, National Initiatives, HealthStream

Karen Sorenson, Associate Vice President, National Initiatives, HealthStreamEven though the Hospice CAHPS Survey does not officially begin until 2015, it’s not too soon to start getting ready for this new CMS-mandated survey. At HealthStream, we’ve been busy preparing for Hospice CAHPS for several months now. As a CMS-approved survey vendor, our CAHPS Project Team has outlined all of the requirements and has worked with CMS to clarify several issues. After thorough capacity, resource and systems planning, HealthStream is ready!

Submission of the 2015 hospice quality measures and CAHPS survey results will impact hospices’ 2017 Medicare payments. The program will start with a mandatory one-month dry run followed by continuous monthly interviewing. The dry run gives hospices and HealthStream
the opportunity to work under test circumstances prior to national implementation. HealthStream will offer both the CMS-approved mail and telephone data collection methodologies. 

The Hospice CAHPS Survey

The Hospice CAHPS Survey is designed to measure the experiences of patients who died while receiving hospice care as reported by their informal caregivers. The family caregiver listed in the hospice record is the individual who will first be contacted to participate in the survey. The survey includes 47 questions covering nine quality measures that will be used for eventual public reporting. The quality measures are:

  1. Hospice Team Communication (5 questions)
  2. Getting Timely Care (2 questions)
  3. Treating Family Member With Respect (2 questions)
  4. Providing Emotional Support (2 questions)
  5. Getting Help for Symptoms (4 questions)
  6. Support for Religious & Spiritual Beliefs (1 question)
  7. Information Continuity (1 question)
  8. Understanding the Side Effects of Pain Medication (1 question)
  9. Getting Hospice Care Training (4 questions)

Survey Timing

The patient’s family caregiver will be surveyed two months after the month of the patient’s death. In other words, the caregivers of April decedents will be surveyed in July. The table below illustrates the lag time between a patient’s death and when surveys will begin with their caregiver.

HealthStream Hospice CAHPSMonthly Patient/Caregiver Lists

Hospices are required to supply monthly lists containing the following data elements for each decedent who died within a calendar month. Preparing the monthly patient lists that you will send to HealthStream will likely be your first and greatest challenge. HealthStream will provide a detailed file specification and we will work with all of our hospices to ensure they can provide an accurate and timely list. We are already working with the larger information companies, like Cerner, to review how these elements can be extracted.

  • Decedent name
  • Decedent date of birth
  • Decedent date of death
  • Decedent sex
  • Decedent race/ethnicity
  • Decedent primary diagnosis
  • Decedent admission date for final episode of hospice care
  • Decedent payers
  • Decedent last location/setting of care (i.e., home, assisted living facility, nursing home, acute care hospital, freestanding hospice inpatient unit)
  • Caregiver name
  • Caregiver contact information, including mailing address, telephone number(s), email address (if available)
  • Caregiver relationship to decedent (e.g., spouse/partner, child, sibling, other, etc.) 

Sampling

The number of caregivers sampled each month is based on the number of survey-eligible decedents in the prior year. Hospices with 50 to 699 survey-eligible decedents in 2014 will be required to survey all cases (census survey). For hospices with 700 or more survey-eligible decedents in 2014, a sample of 700 will be drawn under an equal-probability design. CMS will allow over sampling for hospices that have 700 or more eligible patients.

For national implementation, CMS has assumed an eligibility rate of 85% and a response rate of 50%. For the larger facilities, they anticipate 300 completed surveys based on an annual sample of 700. 

HealthStream is ready for Hospice CAHPS. Are you? Six Ways to Know:

  • Determine if you will be required to participate. Are you on track to have 50 or more decedents in 2014?
  • Work with HealthStream to determine the methodology that best suits your population.
  • Ensure you are capturing the required data elements and can extract them from your system.
  • Orient staff to the survey questions and create standards of behavior for each question.
  • Appoint an internal champion or team to focus on survey results and improvement efforts.
  • Engage staff in Action Plans.

Learn more about Hospice CAHPS and how you can start improving now:  http://www.healthstream.com/products/hospice-cahps.aspx

 

 

 

 

Eight Things to Know About Employed Physicians

  
  
  

This blog post is an excerpt from an article by Robin L. Rose, Vice President, Strategic Initiatives, HealthStream, in the current issue of PX Alert, HealthStream's quarterly e-newsletter devoted to the wide range of challenges, situations, and issues that have an impact on the patient experience. Subscribe to PX Alert.

Convential wisdom in healthcare tells us that the number of employed physicians is on the rise. We have researched the place of physicians in healthcare; highlights of our findings are below:

Employment of Physicians Is on the Rise

The 30-year exodus of physicians from private practice continues, according to a report released in late 2013 by the American Medical Association (AMA). In 1983, some 75.8% of physicians were in private practice, compared to only 46.8% today.

describe the imageEmployment Status Varies by Specialty

Preference for self-employment varies greatly by medical specialty. A whopping 71.9% of surgical subspecialists are still self-employed, while only 37.3% of pediatricians are calling their own shots.

Employed and Self-Employed Physicians Are Equally Satisfied

Although one might assume that employed physicians are less satisfied than their self-employed colleagues, recent studies indicate that overall job satisfaction levels for both groups are about the same.

Job Autonomy and Decision-Making Power Are Key

On-the-job autonomy and decision-making power have long been identified as key drivers of physician satisfaction, independent of whether the physician is employed or self-employed.

Employed Physicians Are Transitioning from Volume to Value

The next challenge facing employed physicians will be the transitioning of financial rewards from volume-based incentives to incentives that are paid to reflect improved quality of patient care. Employed physicians have traditionally received additional pay based on their ability to increase patient volumes.

Employed Physicians May Not Be Sacrificing Financial Gain

Although it has generally been thought that physicians in private practice make more money than employed physicians, Mercer cautions that this is not always the case. Competition for physicians in key specialties is forcing healthcare organizations to pay, if not top dollar, at least highly competitive rates for these providers.

Employed Physicians Value Attention from Administrators

Employed physicians highly value relationships with the healthcare administrators in their organizations, according to research conducted by HealthStream in early 2014 using its Physicians Insights survey.

Employed Physicians Have the View from the Kitchen

Additional research from HealthStream indicates that employed physicians are slightly more critical of their healthcare organizations than other physicians.

Read the entire article here.

 

 

Three Steps for Vital Conversations in Healthcare

  
  
  

This blog post is an excerpt from an article by Katie Owens, Vice President, BLG Practice Leader, HealthStream, in the current issue of PX Alert, HealthStream's quarterly e-newsletter devoted to the wide range of challenges, situations, and issues that have an impact on the patient experience. Subscribe to PX Alert.

If you have ever experienced the following HealthStream Employee Engagement Coachingsymptoms—sweaty palms, rehearsing your talking points, anticipating how the discussion is going to go—you are in good company. This scenario is not preparation for a job interview, but the common anxiety reaction that comes with counseling staff with performance issues to create accountability. In a BLG study of over 26,000 health care leaders, staff, and physicians, the third lowest scoring item in our database is tolerance for poor performers.

Have any of the following ever happened to you?

  • You overlooked or ignored incidents because you were too busy.
  • You intended to give feedback and then days/weeks passed.
  • You felt giving true feedback would create an overwhelming disruption or make matters worse.
  • You felt you did not know what to say and avoided the matter as a result.
  • You spent less time with your high-achievers because you were distracted.

In our work with clients, we consistently find that leaders spend 80% of their time with their underachievers and only 20% of their time with high achievers. Let’s face it, underachievers are exhausting. We worry, try to stop the slipperiness, and take our concerns home to the dinner table. They drain our energy. Our goal for this article is to help you change this common scenario and start on a path to spending 80% of your time with your high-achievers and 20% of the time with your underachievers.

Vital Conversations™ is the art and science a leader uses to retain, develop, or detach from leaders, employees, and physicians. To achieve and sustain outcomes, a leader must be able to communicate clear expectations, define specific behaviors, and provide feedback to direct reports on performance relative to expectations. BLG has developed Vital Conversations as a path to create and sustain systems of accountability and help organizations truly achieve patient-centered excellence.

This article includes:

  • Three questions to get going with Vital Conversations
  • Knowing the difference between high, solid, and underachievers
  • How to conduct Vital Conversations

Link to the full article here.

 

Cascading Goals Have a Great Value in Healthcare: PX Advisor

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article by HealthStream's Dorothy Duncan, Product Manager, in the most recent issue of HealthStream's PX Advisor, our quarterly magazine focused on improving the patient experience.

Outdated systems of setting and assigning goals are about to be upended. As healthcare enters a new age, one that is vastly different from even just five years ago, it’s easy to see that poorly executed goal programs will lead to lackluster results as organizations work to address critical financial and patient care targets. From the rapid-fire pace of new government reforms and regulations to sophisticated cost controls and patient care mandates, hospitals and health systems are ready to adopt new ways of disseminating boardroom strategies across their workforces.

How Can Forward-Focused Organizations Ensure Their Goals Take Flight?

HealthStream PX AdvisorHigh performing organizations ensure that all staff members understand the vision and top objectives and make sure every employee is headed in the same direction. Through the creation of a cascading goal system, which is an efficient way to address the complexities of hospital operations, leadership can share their strategic objectives and ensure that all goals throughout the organization tie back toward achieving those key strategic goals. When implemented correctly, cascading goals systems align goals across business lines, departments, and job titles, creating accountability and leading to measurable results.

Cascading Goals Take Root in Healthcare

Cascading goal systems, or results-based goal-setting, gained credibility and became more prevalent on the healthcare stage after the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award added the healthcare sector to its annual competition in 1999. The awards highlighted the fact that healthcare organizations were sustaining high performance levels by focusing on outcomes throughout their goal-setting processes. This aggressive trend has now become an essential function.

The real value in cascading goal systems, however, may lie beyond simply achieving annual goals. When employees are given clear objectives, the support to excel at their job, and the opportunity to be a part of a high performing workplace, they become more self-directed, engaged, and have less strife at work. This in turn impacts everything from employee retention and patient experience scores to operating margins.

This article includes:

  • Understanding and Addressing Goal-Setting Challenges in Healthcare
  • Aligning Goals To Key Employee Groups
  • The Rise of The Super Employee
  • Leadership’s Role in Developing Goals
  • Top 6 Goal-Setting Practices

Complete the form below to download this issue of PX Advisor.

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