Connect with HealthStream

  • LinkedIn
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • HealthStream Blog RSS

Subscribe by Email

Your email:

Current Articles | RSS Feed RSS Feed

When Will CG-CAHPS Be Required? And Other CAHPS Updates

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article by HealthStream's Karen Sorenson, Associate Vice President, National Initiatives, in the Fall 2014 issue of HealthStream's PX Advisor, our quarterly magazine focused on improving the patient experience.

HealthStream PX AdvisorAt HealthStream, each of our consultants, coaches, and regional directors fields the question in our title several times a week. Clearly, there is a lot of confusion around when medical practices will be required to field the CG-CAHPS survey. Nevertheless, CMS has laid out a clear road map. If you are not already measuring the patient experience in your medical practice, now is the time to start.

CMS’s Role in CG-CAHPS

CMS has two primary mandates around the CGCAHPS survey. One mandate, CAHPS for ACOs, is for Pioneer ACOs and ACOs in the Medicare Shared Savings Program. The second, CAHPS for PQRS, is for medical groups under the Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). Combined with state level mandates and other CMS programs, most group practices across the country soon will be, or already are, mandated to measure the patient experience using a CAHPS survey.

This article includes:

  • Physician Quality Reporting System and CAHPS for PQRS
  • Implementation of the Value-Based Payment Modifier
  • CAHPS for PQRS Reporting Requirements by Size and Reporting Method
  • Where Do We Go (On CG-CAHPS) From Here?
  • Preparing for Hospice CAHPS
  • Preparing for ED -CAHPS
  • Outpatient Surgery CAHPS
  • CAHPS Surveys and Their Role in Quality

 To see survey results and read the article, fill out the form below: 

What Are Healthcare Executives Thinking? A HealthStream Survey Report

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article by HealthStream's Karen Sorenson, Associate Vice President, National Initiatives, in the Fall 2014 issue of HealthStream's PX Advisor, our quarterly magazine focused on improving the patient experience.

HealthStream invited a national panel of healthcare executives, marketers, and consultants to participate in a Predictive Insights survey about healthcare trends. A few of the key topics on the survey included: 

  • HealthStream PX AdvisorChallenges facing healthcare executives
  • Where hospitals will spend the most money during the next five years
  • The impact of the expansion of retail providers of healthcare services
  • If ACOs will succeed in lowering costs and improving quality
  • Challenges facing healthcare marketers
  • Where healthcare marketers will spend the most during the next five years
  • The future role of hospital marketing
  • Community Health Needs Assessment cost and challenges

HealthStream’s 2014 healthcare trends Predictive Insights study tapped into the mindsets of hospital marketers, planners, healthcare executives, and consultants. The participants provided a wealth of information as to what the future holds regarding the challenges facing hospital executives and marketers.

Some of the topics people identified as future concerns were:

  • Improving patient experience
  • Readmissions
  • Recrutiment, training, and retention
  • Capital improvement
  • Population health

To see survey results and read the article, fill out the form below: 

Healthcare Compliance Guidance: The ABCs of Workplace Harassment

  
  
  

All healthcare facilities across the nation need to take harassment prevention training seriously. The risk is too great not to. Harassment claims can negatively impact employee morale and productivity and make it difficult to retain staff. They can also damage your organization’s reputation and lead to lawsuits with the potential for significant financial payments to victims. 

HCCS Compliance Training for HealthcareHarassing behavior can come in many shapes and sizes. For example, making comments about an individual’s physical appearance, unwelcome sexual advances and verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature. 

These are the four types of harassing behavior.

  • The first is verbal.  An example of this would be a person making persistent or offensive jokes or making sexually suggestive comments.
  • The next type of harassment is non-verbal. This includes persistent and unwelcome flirting, staring at someone, looking a person up and down or having “elevator” eyes, and gestures with sexual meaning.
  • A third is physical harassment.  This type of harassment includes inappropriate touching, cornering a person or blocking their path, invading another person’s “physical space” and physical assault.
  • The fourth type of harassment includes written/visual. Displaying sexually suggestive objects, pictures, pornographic photos, or sending sexually suggestive emails. 

Harassing behavior causes a hostile work environment, which is defined as unwelcome workplace behavior that is severe or repeated enough to create an offensive or abusive work environment. 

Required Sexual Harassment Training in California

California state law AB 1825 requires employers with 50 or more employees to provide supervisors with a minimum of two hours of interactive sexual harassment prevention training.  Training must be provided within 6 months of hire or promotion to a supervisory role, and then every 2 years thereafter. In September, California took the already stringent regulations a step further by signing into law regulation AB 2053. 

Taking It a Step Further

Effective January 1, 2015, employers subject to the current California law AB 1825 will also be required to include training materials on the prevention of abusive conduct in the two hours of training. The law defines “abusive conduct” as “conduct of an employer or employee in the workplace, with malice, that a reasonable person would find hostile, offensive, and unrelated to an employer’s legitimate business interests.” While AB 2053 states that a single act is not abusive “unless especially severe and egregious,” it provides an expansive list of abusive
behaviors:

  • Infliction of verbal abuse, such as the use of derogatory remarks
  • Insults
  • Epithets
  • Verbal or physical conduct that a reasonable person would find threatening, intimidating, or humiliating
  • Gratuitous sabotage or undermining of a person’s work performance

While these laws are specific to the state of California, all healthcare facilities across the nation need to take harassment prevention training seriously.  

HCCS’ Preventing Sexual Harassment for Healthcare Organizations online training course provides a comprehensive education program that is interactive and contains video scenarios every healthcare worker will be able to relate to. The course meets regulations set forth by California (and other states) and can be provided to all management, staff, and patient care providers.

Request a free demo

HCCS, a healthStream Company, was founded in 1998 to address urgent compliance education needs of the healthcare industry in response to OIG mandates for compliance education. Our principals have extensive experience in healthcare management, compliance, consulting, training, and the development of cutting edge technology. Our Advisory Boards and content contributors include compliance officers, law firms, privacy officers, security officers, consultants, trainers, and clients.  Content is created, managed, and updated by our internal content department with healthcare compliance expertise. We are focused exclusively on healthcare compliance and competency.

Engage Healthcare Staff with Private, Group, and Corporate Recognition

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience best practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

Private Recognition

Healthcare Recogntion TrainingWhile public recognition is important, often it is private recognition that is most meaningful to employees. The most fundamental form of private recognition is a leader’s words of praise and appreciation delivered with a smile to the employee. Hardly anything comes across as more sincere than a few well-chosen and timely phrases that describe the valued behavior, personally conveyed.

A second, highly effective means is a handwritten, thank you note sent directly to the employee’s home. When appreciation is expressed in such a caring manner, there can be no doubt of the leader’s sincerity. Another way is the personal presentation of a recognition
certificate. While many people express the opinion that these are “corny” and too standardized to be meaningful, nevertheless certificates usually end up being posted in the recipient’s work space.

Group Recognition

Group recognition is intended to build team loyalty, and can be celebrated at the department, team, or committee level. Some of the reasons for group celebrations include: anniversaries, patient satisfaction scores, meeting a goal, finishing a big project, or for support in general. For example, the Employee Loyalty Team of a hospital hosts an annual celebration to thank each person who volunteers to serve on a team.

Consider incorporating one of the themes and activities below into a recognition event for a team.

  • Coffee Break – Starbucks coffee and coffee cake
  • The Stars Come Out/Shine Movie theme with lemonade and popcorn
  • HOT! HOT! HOT! – Team members can bring in their “famous” salsa recipe; the leader can provide different kinds of chips.
  • Death by Chocolate Party – Cookies, bars, cakes, pies, fudge
  • Build Your Own Sundae
  • You Put Your Heart into It! – Buy heart shaped cookies or decorated cake from bakery
  • Bubble Gum – Chewing/blowing bubble gum party and/or contest
  • Picnic or Meeting on the Grounds – Go outside for your meeting or celebration
  • Treat Your Team to a Chair Massage – Contact local school of massage and get reduced rate or free massages; students have to have so many hours to graduate; or, if you have an on-site massage therapist,  negotiate a deal
  • Bring a Basket of Goodies – Team shares crackers, cheese, nuts, etc.
  • Cello Goody Bags – Stuffed with candy/treats
  • Emergency Kit – Band aids, safety pin, always a piece of chocolate, etc. (in case you have to call an emergency meeting)
  • Take Pictures – Random pictures of individuals and team members; blow them up, have CEO or senior leaders and team leader sign
  • Overboard Party – Hawaiian punch with umbrellas, cookies
  • Card Party – Deal a deck of cards; being dealt the Joker (or a certain card) earns a prize
  • Flower Seed Packets –“Thanks for making our patient satisfaction (organization) grow”
  • It’s Electric – High-functioning team celebration (do the electric slide)
  • Achy Breaky Heart – Team discusses what’s missing or not going well; use this theme also when a team member leaves. Feature heart decoration and a line dance
Corporate Celebrations

Corporate reward and recognition events are held in celebration of the organization’s entire employee base. Department leaders participate in the planning and implementation of such events. Corporate celebrations are scheduled around specific achievements involving all staff
members, such as patient satisfaction scores that meet or exceed quarterly goals. Other events
might focus on professional recognition such as National Hospital Week or Nurses’ Day. Another celebration might signify an industry milestone, such as receiving a national award or celebrating a significant anniversary.

The level of enthusiasm conveyed by leaders when communicating celebratory information to employees is critical to its success. An enormous amount of time, energy and expense is devoted to celebrating employees’ successes through these events. Leaders are expected to publicize and personally invite their staff members to participate in “being celebrated.” 

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

 

White Paper: Hourly Rounding and HCAHPS Improvement

  
  
  

Why is Hourly Rounding So Important?

Hourly Rounding Improves HCAHPS ScoresOrganizations that are consistently successful in maintaining outstanding HCAHPS scores are those that provide the “always” experience—every patient, every time. These organizations focus on the details—that is, the quality of the care experience, while keeping an eye to the larger picture of providing that quality of care at every possible patient encounter. In the world of acute healthcare, few practices provide more opportunities for patient-centered care than hourly rounding; and, if we had to pick one tactic that might impact patients the most, hourly rounding would certainly be considered. Hourly rounding exemplifies care at the bedside, the point at which we can consistently connect with the patient during his or her hours of need. And, while this point-of-care tactic is most often employed by nursing, it can and should also be employed by every representative of the hospital who enters the patient room.

What makes this tactic both successful and potentially difficult is the sheer volume of patient encounters. We, as clinicians and ancillary staff alike, have many opportunities at the bedside to establish and maintain behaviors exemplifying great care; conversely, there are many opportunities to fail to do so. Only by hardwiring this approach will we provide that ‘always’ care. 

What is Hourly Rounding Really?

A patient’s perception of the quality of nursing care is largely dependent on the staff’s ability to anticipate and meet that patient’s needs. The implications are vast. Not only is clinical excellence an expectation, but service excellence is also required. And, patients must understand that excellence is being delivered. As BLG’s founder Al Stubblefield has said, we must deliver a “wow” experience. Hourly rounding is a purposeful approach that allows us to successfully anticipate and meet the patient’s needs. It requires aligned and structured patient-centered behaviors, and it provides an effective framework for achieving the level of consistency required for HCAHPS excellence.

This paper also includes:

  • Critical Success Factors for Hourly Rounding
  • Accountability for Hourly Rounding
  • Outcomes of Hourly Rounding
  • Best practices for Hourly Rounding 

Complete the form below to download the white paper.

The Business Case for Leadership Assessment in Healthcare

  
  
  

This article by Kevin Groves, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Management, Graziadio School of Business and Management, Pepperdine University, and President of Groves Consulting Group, was featured in the inaugural issue of HealthStream's Healthcare Workforce Advisor, our quarterly magazine designed to bring you thought leadership and best practices for developing the healthcare workforce.

HealthStream Healthcare Workforce AdvisorOf the many critical challenges facing healthcare organizations, including the intensifying transition from volume to value-based performance metrics, reimbursement degradation and dwindling margins, and the emergence of accountable care organizations (ACOs), none is more daunting than the rapidly aging workforce and its impact on identifying and sustaining a pipeline of leadership talent. The ‘5/50 crisis’—a common refrain from human resource professionals regarding the expectation that 50% of management staff will be eligible to retire in 5 years—is exacerbated for healthcare organizations. By 2020, 75% of nurse leaders will have either retired or be eligible to do so  while the pools of potential future leaders are shrinking. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (2014) currently predicts that by 2022, the U.S. labor force share of those 55 years or older will increase by 29% while the share of those ages 25-54 and 16-24 will contract by 2% and 13%, respectively. As such, healthcare organizations face the formidable task of identifying high-potential leaders for a surging number of leadership roles while concurrently the pool of potential leaders is shrinking and the requisite leadership competencies of key leadership roles are changing.

These dramatic workforce shifts place a premium on a health system’s talent management capabilities, specifically the identification, development, deployment, and retention of leadership talent. The identification of high-potential leaders in healthcare organizations is particularly critical as many of the published or commercial tools fail to capture the challenges that high-potential employees face as they transition into leadership roles. Given the increasing importance of accurately assessing future leadership talent and the overall lack of research that targets the unique transition challenges of healthcare leaders, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 28 nursing, physician, and administrative leaders across a diverse sample of hospitals and health systems. These leaders included Chief Nursing Officers (CNOs), Clinical Directors, Chief Medical Officers (CMOs), Medical Directors, Medical Group CEOs, and Chief HR Officers (CHROs). While the interviews focused on a range of high-potential leadership assessment issues, two key findings are summarized below: (1) the primary challenges faced by high-potential employees as they transition into leadership roles, and (2) the critical characteristics (traits, competencies/skills, knowledge bases, etc.) that designate an employee as demonstrating readiness for leadership success.

The full article addresses:

  • Leadership transition challenges
  • High-potential leadership characteristics
  • High-Potential Healthcare Leadership Model
  • Important Applications for Healthcare Organizations 

Subscribe to Healthcare Workforce Advisor. 

Complete the form below to download this issue of Healthcare Workforce Advisor.

Workforce Professional Development is Important in Post-Acute Care

  
  
  

We are proud to offer this guest blog from our partner, Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging, by Stella Hatcliffe, RN, MSc, CPHQ – Director of Professional Education

Stella Hatcliffe, Mather Lifeways Institute on AgingAs healthcare providers in senior living communities we owe it to ourselves and our residents to be engaged in our own professional development and lifelong learning so we can continue to be knowledgeable about evidence-based care and new strategies to enhance our resident’s experiencesSome of the topics we are focusing on in senior living are reducing resident falls, pressure ulcers, pain, and readmissions to a hospital setting. As care providers in senior living we need to be able to understand the complexity of caring for older adults by mastering critical thinking, promoting wellness, chronic care management, and cultural competency. Thus, our ongoing professional development is very important. Through embracing professional development we become empowered and confident as we apply our new skills to real-life scenarios and make a difference in our resident’s lives.

Challenges in promoting professional development, such as time and financial resources for training, can act as barriers to workforce development. Therefore it is important that we measure benefits and outcomes of our investment in achieving our organizations' strategic goals.  Some of these goals may include:

  • Higher focus on resident safety and satisfaction by promoting a culture of person-centered care
  • Higher staff retention and internal promotion opportunities  
  • Enhanced  sense of  team work and trust  as we share common goals and best practices

HealthStream post acute care trainingWithin the nursing field it has become common to hear about workforce hostility and the concept of “older nurses eating their young.” Organizations that embrace peer mentoring programs to enhance new employee professional development can reverse this concept. As more experienced nurses mentor new staff and help them to develop skills and confidence, they too become more satisfied and ultimately increase the person-centered service within their organization. I have also seen a positive impact of professional development sessions and learning circles which embrace different professional groups; by learning together we gain additional insights and appreciation into each other’s roles and learn to work more collaboratively. In summary, professional development opportunities reinforce the concept that leaders care about staff through investing in education to promote best practices. 

Learn more about HealthStream's workforce development solutions for post-acute care staff.

About the Author

Stella Hatcliffe is responsible for professional education programs, certification programs, and educational products that create ways for older adults to Age Well, as well as for development of curriculum to support stimulating learning environments. Stella Hatcliffe is an experienced health care leader with progressive clinical and administrative experience in improving healthcare operations, quality indicators and evidence-based person centered care to residents and their families. She has extensive experience in hospitals and elder care settings in the United States and England. She has served as chief nursing officer, vice president of patient care, and clinical nurse specialist in Geriatrics. Her areas of expertise include staff development, enhancing resident experience, falls and pressure ulcer prevention, reducing hospital readmissions, and palliative and hospice care. She also collaborates with Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging researchers to support creation and evaluation of new educational programs. She is master’s-prepared in research and evaluation of health care services, and a certified professional in health care quality and nurse leadership.

About Mather LifeWays Institute on Aging

 

 

 

Engage Healthcare Staff Further with Advanced Public Recognition

  
  
  

This blog post continues yesterday's post in our series of patient experience best practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

The following are some advanced recognition programs that we have found to be effectivefor further engagging healthcare staff members:

Advanced Recognition Programs for Existing Employees

describe the imageSSTARR (Superior Service Through Activities of Reward and Recognition) Awards: SSTARR awards are a recognition system designed to reward employees whose behaviors exceeded their scope of service in support of one or more of the organization’s key focus areas (also known as pillars). You can also reward staff members for behaviors that vividly illustrate your standards of performance, your values, or that inspire and raise morale to a higher degree.

Champions: When an employee does something so exceptional that a SSTARR award seems inadequate, honor the individual with a Champion award. That employee may be introduced at  the monthly department head meeting where a framed plaque or other memento is presented, honoring the person as a Champion. Honorees could also be introduced and recognized at your organization’s Board of Directors meeting as well. You may want to mount a special panel in a high traffic corridor where pictures and brief stories of each Champion can be posted.

Legends: Legends, chosen annually, are employees who have performed an extraordinary act of kindness worthy of praise and recognition. For example, an employee of a customer health provider was honored because she rallied other staff members to provide clothes, food, and money for a family who lost its home in a house fire. You will want to make this annual award an event so that other employees will aspire to become a Legend. Consider transporting your Legends by limousine to the annual Board of Directors meeting. After dining with board members, tell their stories in a video featuring the employees in their actual work environments. The Legends would then be presented with a  special pin and a plaque. Printed booklets with photos and stories of the Legends are  distributed to each Awardee. And, you can also post their stories on your organization’s Intranet and display a placard with their story and photo in a prominent location in your facility.

You Made It Happen” Leader Award: This recognition is given to leaders responsible for organizing and staging significant community events, initiatives, and other endeavors on behalf of the organization. To encourage other leaders to “make it happen,” present this award during monthly department head meetings.

New Employee On-Boarding Recognition

Lend A Hand: Give new employees a small “hand print” sticker to place on the upper left  corner of their identification badges during their first 90 days with the organization. When other staff members see the sticker, they can take special care in welcoming the newcomer, as well as offering assistance.

Voyages: After new employees have been on-board for six weeks, invite them to attend a fun-filled, six-hour Voyages class. Designed as a post-orientation refresher course, Voyages reviews your organization’s strategic areas of focus or Pillars, your Standards of Performance, various reward and recognition programs, and other material. Skits and contests help engage participants. Afterward, a formal graduation can be held. You may also post photos of the graduates on a bulletin board.

90-Day Cards for New Employees: Continue to make employees who’ve completed their first 90 days on the job feel welcome by presenting them with a card signed by their coworkers and leader, along with a photograph of departmental teammates.

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

 

Use Various Public Recognition Strategies to Reward Healthcare Staff

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience best practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

We believe that everyone in an organization deserves a chance to be a hero—to make a difference; thus we recommend tiers of recognition and awards. Your award system can be similar or take a different form. Use your own judgment about the culture you want to create. And remember it may take time to make it happen. Your reward system will probably evolve
gradually, and you will implement new ideas and recognition systems as you gain insight. The important thing to keep in mind is that a reward system keeps employees invested in your culture.

Here are some suggestions for recognizing, both publicly and privately, the people who make your organization successful.

I.   Public Recognition

Public recognition is that which is shared with peers, most often through formal recognition
programs. The Leadership Institute has helped client organizations implement many of the
following structured initiatives; your organization may already be taking advantage of many of these opportunities to recognize your workforce.

Standard Structured Public Recognition Programs

Recognition Days: Celebrate recognition days fromRewards Training for Healthcare the health and wellness calendar, such as Nurses’ Week, Doctor’s Day, Christian Emphasis Week, Physical Therapy Month, etc. Typical
observances may include a meal and a small gift or certificate of thanks. In addition, celebrate achievement of patient satisfaction goals with a special event or meal.

Multi-Year Service Awards: Service award ceremonies recognize and honor employees who have reached five years and up milestones. There are many options for recognizing these individuals. Consider opening the monthly or quarterly session to the entire organization  so that leaders and co-workers can express their appreciation for the employee’s years of service. For major milestones such as the 25 year mark, organizations usually will want to provide extra recognition whether in the form of a letter from the president of the organization, a pin with a precious stone, or other token of appreciation. Annually your organization will likely host a service award reception or dinner to thank your employees for their years of service; offer
to the longest term employees additional honors in the form of a plaque and/or cash award.

Annual Birthday Gifts and Cards: Employees’ individual birthdays are special days that deserve recognition. Recognition does not have to be expensive; a simple Happy Birthday
card from the organization is nice or it may be combined with a small gift. Your Human Resources department can be in charge of making the cards and gifts available to leaders to pick up on a monthly basis. This recognition takes little effort but will have a heart-felt impact
on employees, such as a new staff member of Baptist Health Care who recently commented that she had “never before had the privilege to work for a company that took the time to honor
each individual employee’s birthday.”

Employee of the Month: This award is presented to exemplary employees who have been recognized by their peers as role models. In many organizations, only department leaders are able to nominate employees, while in others anyone can submit a nomination. A great way to announce the monthly winner is for the president of the hospital to surprise the employee in his or her department. The president would then present an award at a small reception attended by the honoree’s co- workers. Public recognition is achieved by posting the employee’s photo in a prominent hospital location. Annually, all twelve honorees would become eligible for the Employee of the Year award.

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

 

New PX Advisor Focuses on Healthcare Quality and Patient Experience

  
  
  

We are proud to offer another issue of HealthStream’s PX Advisor. Through this quarterly publication, our goal is to deliver relevant thought leadership, industry discussion, and data-based insights to help positively impact the patient experience and perception of care at healthcare organizations.

HealthStream PX Advisor Fall 2014The Fall 2014 issue of PX Advisor aligns closely with one of the most important contributors to the patient experience: quality. It addresses high-level quality issues, including our feature article where we talk to TeamHealth’s Miles Snowden, MD, MPH, about changes in the physician workplace. He describes the realignment of physicians into larger working groups and how collaboration between specialties and consensus around care practices promises to boost care quality overall. In another article focused on Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs), readers will learn about the quality gains being achieved by the ACO structure of care delivery.

Specific quality improvements that impact the patient experience are also addressed in this issue. For example, healthcare organizations are adopting state-of-the-art, innovative resuscitation training, with voice-assisted manikins, that incorporates the latest research-based findings. The results have been a more highly skilled workforce in this life-saving knowledge and, in turn, improved resuscitation outcomes.

The latest trends regarding patients’ perceptions of care quality are reported. Based on HealthStream’s data from five years of survey results, it is evident that patients’ experiences of care are broadly improving throughout the United States. At the same time, surveys of healthcare employees and physicians indicate that there are ample opportunities for organizations to focus their efforts to improve operations and the work environment in order to achieve better outcomes.

This issue of PX Advisor includes: 

  • Feature Articlez: Q&A with Dr. Miles Snowden, TeamHealth’s Chief Medical Officer on Quality in Healthcare
  • Re-CAHPS: When Will CG-CAHPS Be Required?
  • Under the Microscope: HealthStream’s Predictive Insights National
    Healthcare Marketing & Strategy Industry Study
  • Product Innovation: The Impact of Device Training on Quality Improvements
  • And the Data Says: Focused on Quality, Hospitals Improve Patient Experience Results
  • Industry Perspective: Hospitals: The Care Quality Impact of Accountable Care Organizations
  • Your Tool Box: Does Your Staff Deliver High-Quality CPR?
  • Partner Spotlight: Building a Foundation for Quality Improvement in Post-Acute Care
  • Customer Spotlight: HealthStream Awards of Excellence
  • Our Talent Pool: Q&A with Leigh Anne Bradley, Director of Coaching, BLG, a HealthStream Company
  • HealthStream Summit 2015

Complete the form below to download this issue of PX Advisor.

All Posts