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Reward and Recognize Physicians: Healthcare Employee Engagement

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience best practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

Doctors, just like all of your staff, deserve and want to be recognized and rewarded for their contributions to the organization. The Leadership Group recommends developing multiple ways to recognize physicians. The following are some suggestions:

  • Handwritten thank you notes
  • Family events
  • Doctor’s Day luncheons with gifts
  • Leadership Retreats (that may include their families)
  • Seek their input to facilitate change or process improvement effort
  • New physician orientation
  •  Physician “mingling” (to welcome and introduce new physicians)
  • Newspaper articles
  • SSTARR awards
  • Press releases
  • Letters to physicians who are mentioned on surveys
  • Leadership development strategy
  • Leaders’ pictures in hallways
  • Christmas luncheons for physicians and their staff
  • Gift certificates to physician leaders (as a Christmas gift)
  • Birthday cards from administration
  • Cookie baskets to department chairs for their hard work
  • Doctors’ Notes newsletter publication
  • Website recognition

In Conclusion--Why Focus on Rewards and Recognition

Healthcare rewards and recognition trainingReward and recognition is but one part of the larger framework of employee satisfaction, but it is a vital factor in the process. Motivation, personal enrichment and self-esteem, commitment and loyalty are all by-products of employee recognition. Plus, it becomes a powerful recruiting tool for those who see satisfied employees practicing ownership and being celebrated for their efforts.

Effective recognition programs require planning and careful thought on the part of leaders who are responsible for nurturing the process. HealthStream recommends that you construct a variety of formal and informal initiatives for leaders to implement, in addition to their own personalized department-specific programs.

Through celebrating your employees, you will find that your organization enjoys a happier, more joyful work environment. Demonstrating the value placed on staff can result in lower urnover rates, improved productivity, higher patient satisfaction, and other superior performance measurements.  

Reward and Recognition Training

We teach key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

Magnet® Designation: Why it Matters and What You Need to Know

  
  
  

This blog post is an excerpt from an article by Gen Guanci, MEd, RN-BC, CCRN, Creative Health Care Management, in the current issue of PX Alert, HealthStream's quarterly e-newsletter devoted to the wide range of challenges, situations, and issues that have an impact on the patient experience. Subscribe to PX Alert.

The beauty of using the pursuit of Magnet® designation as the framework for your cultural transformation is that it sets out clear parameters for all aspects of the transformation. The very pursuit of Magnet® designation will almost certainly bring your organization a myriad of improvements in nursing excellence, nurse satisfaction, and nurse retention.

Genesis of the Magnet Recognition Program®

HealthStream Magnet SolutionsDespite a serious nursing shortage in the 1980s, it came to light that several hospitals throughout the United States were still attracting and retaining nurses. With sponsorship from the American Nurses Association, a team of nurse researchers set out to determine what was occurring at those organizations that made each of them a “magnet” for nurses. Their findings pointed to excellence in administration and professional practice, as well as a consistent and visible commitment to professional development (McClure & Hinshaw, 2002).

Several years later, Marlene Kramer and her colleagues identified more of the conditions that were present in organizations that were successful in attracting and retaining nurses. This is a compiled a list of the “essentials of Magnetism”:

  • Working with nurses who are clinically competent
  • Good RN/MD relationships (collaborative/collegial)
  • Nurse autonomy and accountability
  • Control of nursing practice and the practice environment
  • Supportive nurse manager/supervisor
  • Support for education
  • Adequate nurse staffing
  • Emphasis on concern for patient (Kramer, 2003)

In short order, a few other commonalities were discovered. Hospitals that were able to attract and retain nurses showed the following outcomes:

  • Lower morbidity and mortality rates
  • Higher patient and nurse satisfaction
  • Less nurse burnout
  • Higher levels of professional nursing practice

Nurse leaders and researchers were closer than ever to defining what must be present in an organization in order for nurses to thrive.

In 1993, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) established the Magnet Nursing Services Recognition Program for Excellence in Nursing to formally recognize organizations that demonstrated excellence in nursing practice. Since that time, more than 401 hospitals in the United States and abroad have gone on to receive or maintain Magnet® status. This number, however, continues to comprise less than 7 percent of the hospitals in the United States.

In 2002, the ANCC, “realizing it requires an initiative on the part of the whole organization and a change in its culture, chose another name—the Magnet Recognition Program®. This change confirmed what nurses already knew and valued… it takes the whole healthcare team to ensure good patient outcomes” (Guanci, 2005). Further program revisions were made in 2005 so that the designation review process focused on the 14 Forces of Magnetism. Then in 2008, ANCC unveiled the New Magnet Model, which consists of five components:

  • Transformational Leadership
  • Structural Empowerment
  • Exemplary Professional Practice
  • New Knowledge/Innovations and Improvements
  • Empirical Outcomes

August 2013 saw the release of the 2014 Magnet Application Manual, which now offers specific instructions of the examples to submit, as well as an increased emphasis on concrete evidence. Fifty percent of the document submission must address the sustainable outcomes organizations have achieved.

What those who have designed the Magnet® designation program have given us is a set of tangible outcomes to which we can aspire. Taken together, the Magnet® components and their associated requirements help us to understand our destination, but they do far less to help us understand the route we need to take to get there. For this, an experienced guide is necessary. More than 30 percent of organizations fail on their first attempt at Magnet® designation. While it is quite likely that their organizations have benefited in some intangible ways from the process itself, pursuing Magnet® is costly, and failing to achieve designation means the measurable ROI on that investment is nonexistent.

Ready, Set…Pause

There’s no doubt about it: the pursuit of Magnet® designation has a lot more in common with a marathon than it does with a sprint.

The full article also describes:

  • 7 essential things to do before embarking on your Magnet® journey
  • 10 Lessons Learned from Multiple Magnet® Journeys
  • The value of having experienced Magnet® partners

Link to the Full article.

10 Ways to Make Patient Experience Fit into Your 2015 Quality Plan

  
  
  

By Karen Sorensen, Associate Vice President, National Initiatives, HealthStream

As the year winds to a close, it is a perfect time to review your patient experience surveys in preparation for 2015.  Nearly every aspect of the patient experience is covered or soon will be covered by a CAHPS survey. Hospice CAHPS, ED-CAHPS and Outpatient Surgery CAHPS, CAHPS for ACOs, and CAHPS for PQRS are all in various stages of national implementation. Clearly, patient experience surveys are an integral part of CMS’s plan to improve the quality of healthcare.

We invited our HealthStream team to provide their suggestions on what you should be doing now.  The following is our checklist of ideas, and important questions to ask yourself as you prepare for 2015.

  1. Set goals. HealthStream believes that setting achievable goals is foundational to improvement, and our team is united in agreeing this should be your first priority. Are you using the Priority Analysis report on Insights Online to identify where to focus?  Are you setting achievable goals that are tailored for all areas of the organization? HealthStream can help you use our online tools to establish goals that will meet your needs.HealthStream HCAHPS Solutions
  2. Review your quotas. Are there any gaps where you need patient feedback? Are your sample sizes sufficient to allow you to drill down to a level that promotes accountability? For example, surveying “Radiology” may not give you the detail you need to measure the patient experience in mammography, CT or MRI. Setting unit-level sampling targets will ensure you have data necessary to hold staff accountable.
  3. Review your custom questions. Are these questions still important? Are you doing anything with the feedback?  Are there any trends in the core questions or verbatim comments where you may need to focus attention?
  4. HealthStream HCAHPS SolutionsAudit your patient sample submission process. Are you sending complete and accurate files to HealthStream? Are you sending your patient files on a regular schedule to ensure patients are contacted by HealthStream as close to discharge as possible? Missing or incomplete records could result in patients being contacted that should not be. For example, for HCAHPS if critical elements are missing (e.g., DRG, Service Line), we must assume that the patient is eligible to be surveyed.
  5. Ensure your surveys are aligned with other mandates and programs. For example, if you are a Magnet facility or are pursuing Magnet designation, are your surveys capturing the required patient satisfaction metrics? Magnet has approved HealthStream’s mapping of our Patient Insights surveys to the Magnet categories.
  6. Use your staff to maximize survey response rates. Higher response rates promote greater confidence in the results. The single most effective way to improve response rates is to tell patients they may receive a survey from HealthStream. We have many resources to help you train your staff on the survey process and to prepare them to answer patients’ questions. Are your employees able to talk about the patient experience survey?
  7. Improve survey “literacy” within the organization. Does your staff know the questions that are being asked of patients? Do they know how patients are being surveyed – telephone, mail, eSurvey? Do they understand top box and percentile ranking?
  8. Engage your employees in improvement efforts. Does your staff understand their role and how they impact the patient experience? The more staff understands how what they do impacts the patient experience, the more they can be part of the solution. Do managers have the tools and resources needed to improve?
  9. Study success. HealthStream offers a multitude of best practices and support to help organizations improve, but don’t overlook the success stories within your own facility. What are you doing to support managers who are struggling? Are you sharing internal best practices?
  10. Let HealthStream help. Whether you need someone to help you interpret your scores, assist in goal setting or need more in-depth coaching, we can help. Our coaches teach organizations how to become more consistent in their processes through evidence-based tools, tactics and best practices. We focus on strategies that have the greatest potential impact for rapid CAHPS improvement.

So, what are you doing to prepare for 2015?

Learn about HealthStream HCAHPS solutions.

 

Best Practices for Healthcare Rewards and Recognition

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience best practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

Over the years, BLG has been privileged to partner with many organizations as they embark on their own journey. The following are three reward and recognition bst practices our partners crafted, nique to their very own healthcare environments.

Reward and Recognition Team

A BLG partner established a Reward and Recognition Team that meets regularly to plan and implement ongoing events and initiatives, with a goal of keeping the program’s momentum alive and well. The following are a few of their highly successful celebratory efforts in honor of employees.

  • Healthcare Rewards and REcognition TrainingBirthday with the Boss: each month, employees are invited to attend their choice of breakfast or lunch with the CEO in one of the hospital’s conference rooms to celebrate their birthday; nice meal is served and each employee is given a special gift
  • Employee Service Awards banquet
  • Chair massages on Thursdays
  • Free Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday buffets
  • Perfect attendance recognition (special reception, certificate presented and drawings for special prizes including a trip to a resort area)
  • Valentine’s Day Ice Cream Social/Late Night Sweetheart Breakfast for 3rd Shift employees (administrative team cooks and serves employees)
  • Holiday trips for employees/families that feature discounted tickets and rides on chartered buses at no charge
  • Free tickets to sporting events including baseball, arena football, and hockey games
  • Employee bowling league and basketball team (jerseys/fees paid by hospital)
  • Wall of Fame recognition
  • Hospital Connection – daily briefings with staff for improvement of communication and recognition of employees’ special achievements
Prize Patrol

The Measurement Team at another healthcare facility in the Southeast formed a “Prize Patrol” who publicly acknowledges departments for excelling in patient satisfaction survey scores. The team, which monitors the scores on a weekly basis, recognizes two areas each month: the department with the highest score and the most improved. Together with a representative from administration, the hard-hat-outfitted Prize Patrol members burst in on the two unsuspecting and honored departments with goodies, banners that are hung on the spot, and great fanfare.

Because the team keeps a close watch on patient satisfaction scores across the organization, the department/unit recognitions are immediate which makes them even more powerful. It has proved to be an exciting way to keep employees engaged about cultural improvements, and promote friendly competition among departments.

Caught You Caring

A client hospital in Pennsylvania mounted a “Caught You Caring” initiative to reinforce  extraordinary customer service behaviors through peer recognition. They found that asking employees to recognize and document acts of extraordinary customer service had a twofold effect: increased attention to the contributions of co-workers, along with enhanced collaboration and teamwork.

Without prior announcement, Caught You Caring ballot boxes and nomination forms appear in every hospital department and unit. Employees who observe co-workers providing extraordinary “customer service efforts or random acts of kindness” simply document the behavior and place the form in the ballot box.

Again without prior announcement, the Caught You Caring boxes are removed and the forms
are collected. The following day, the campaign is celebrated in the employee dining room by a random drawing of several ballots, with small prizes subsequently awarded to those recognized. All submitted forms are posted in the dining area, and the president’s message in the monthly employee newsletter highlights several examples of extraordinary service.

In order to keep Caught You Caring fresh and fun, each campaign is somewhat different and is never announced. Caught You Caring boxes appear and disappear at the discretion of the President/CEO. Prizes, which change with each campaign, have included t-shirts, gift cards to local restaurants, and gas gift cards.

Finally, while the employee whose ballot form is randomly selected always receives an award, other prizes are bestowed which vary from campaign to campaign. For example, cookie trays may be delivered to the selected employee’s department. Or an award might be offered to the individual who took the time to document the outstanding service of his/her co-worker.

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

Triaging Post-Acute Care Retention and Turnover

  
  
  

This blog post is an excerpt from an article by Wendy Shumate, Senior Marketing Manager, HealthStream, in the current issue of PX Alert, HealthStream's quarterly e-newsletter devoted to the wide range of challenges, situations, and issues that have an impact on the patient experience. Subscribe to PX Alert.

Healthcare leaders have faced the issues of retention and turnover for decades. In fact, as early as 1946, many hospitals were reporting unexpected and severe shortages as nurses returning from service in WWII did not resume work in civilian hospitals (Whelen, 2014). Now the shortage has become a national crisis, especially for organizations that provide post-acute care and are experiencing high turnover rates and recruiting difficulties. To add to the concern of these chronic staff shortages, demand for the need of post-acute care services continues to increase.

HealthStream Training and Talent Management Solutions for Post-Acute CareIt is projected that by 2050, 27 million Americans (up from 15 million in 2000) will require some type of post-acute care service. This surge is in part due to the aging baby boomer population. According to estimates by The Department of Health and Human Services, in order to meet this demand, the need for direct care workers will increase by over 200%. Unfortunately, this alarmingly increased need comes at a time when the overall workforce supply is beginning to level out.

Because the demand for post-acute care services will continue to outpace the availability of healthcare workers, it will become increasingly important for organizations to develop and retain their employees. “There are excessive costs associated with turnover due to recruitment, training, and loss of experiential knowledge. Besides the bottom line costs, chronic turnover leads to greater workloads for remaining staff, which in turn contributes to low morale, and ultimately reduced quality of care,” says Louis Vick, HealthStream’s post-acute care product manager.

This article includes:

  • Build Success with Screening and Placement
  • 6-Step Screening and Pre-Hire Assessment Process
  • Share the Vision and Goals
  • Focus on Engagement

Link to the Full article.

Building a Foundation for Quality Improvement in Post-Acute Care

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article by Linda Hollinger-Smith PhD, RN, FAAN, Vice President, Mather LifeWays Institute On Aging, in the Fall 2014 issue of HealthStream's PX Advisor, our quarterly magazine focused on improving the patient experience.

Faced by an aging population and significant growth in the population of those 85 years of age and older, the need for quality, cost-effective, post-acute care is anticipated to rise significantly. During the past decade, post-acute care has evolved, providing more complex, specialized care in skilled nursing, rehabilitation facilities, assisted living and home settings, and reaching growing numbers of short-stay residents post-hospital stay. Reforms in reimbursement and regulatory initiatives require greater focus on quality improvement efforts targeting the resident at the center of care delivery and health outcomes.

Growth of Post-Acute Care

HealthStream PX AdvisorThe growth of post-acute care is tied to the beginning of Medicare’s prospective payment system for acutecare hospitals in the mid-1980s, which incentivized hospital providers to reduce length of stay by moving patients to post-acute care settings at earlier points in their recovery. These settings can be aligned on a continuum of acuity as noted in the figure above.

The primary growth in post-acute care has been at the low end of the continuum in the home health services/care and skilled nursing settings. Combined, these two settings account for about 80% of all post-acute care Medicare expenditures.

In 2010, the Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law. In terms of key objectives, the ACA focuses on reducing the growth of healthcare costs while promoting high-value, efficient, and high-quality care (U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, 2014). Much of the progress thus far in terms of implementing components of the ACA has focused on the reporting and transparency requirements that form the basis for evaluating the quality of care provided by post-acute organizations (Kaiser Commission, 2013).

This article includes:

  • Quality Improvement in Post-Acute Care
  • Strategies to Improve Quality in Post-Acute Care
  • A New Post-Acute Care Framework, Quality Assurance and Performance Improvement (QAPI)
  • Putting QAPI to Work: Caring for a Resident with Late-Stage Alzheimer’s Disease
  • QAPI Activities to Evaluate Physical Aspects of Care
  • Additional Resources Focused on Building a Foundation of Quality in Post-Acute Care 

 To download the full issue and article complete the form below:

HCAHPS and ED-CAHPS Update: CMS Taking Comments on Mode Experiments

  
  
  

By Karen Sorensen, Associate Vice President, National Initiatives, HealthStream

On November 28, 2014, CMS announced their plan to conduct two CAHPS mode experiments – one on the established HCAHPS Survey, and the other on the new Emergency Department Patient Experience of Care Survey (ED-CAHPS). Prior to public reporting of CAHPS surveys, CMS adjusts the scores based on the mode of survey administration (telephone, mail, mail-telephone mixed mode or IVR). The mode adjustments are designed to correct for any inflation or deflation of scores that are a result of mode.

HealthStream HCAHPS SurveysCMS states that the current mode adjustments used for HCAHPS are the result of two separate experiments conducted using different versions of the survey and different samples. The purpose of the planned HCAHPS mode experiment is to determine if the current adjustments need revision. An additional goal is to determine the effect of the number of additional supplemental items on survey response rate and patterns of response to the HCAHPS core demographic items (known as "About You" items). You may recall that CMS has required that HealthStream and all survey vendors submit the number of supplemental questions hospitals add to the HCAHPS Survey since October 2013.

Additionally, CMS proposes to conduct a mode experiment on the new ED-CAHPS survey. CMS concluded their pilot of this survey earlier in 2014 and released revised surveys in August. The planned mode experiment is an additional milestone required prior to national implementation of this new CAHPS survey.

HealthStream encourages you to participate in the public comment process. If you have opinions on HCAHPS and/or new ED-CAHPS Survey, let your voice be heard. CMS must receive your comments by January 27, 2015.

For information on how to submit your comments to CMS: https://federalregister.gov/a/2014-28137

Learn about HealthStream's CAHPS Surveys solutions.

The Leader's Role in Healthcare Staff Rewards and Recognition

  
  
  

This blog post continues our series of patient experience best practices from BLG, a HealthStream Company. Every week we will share information from BLG that demonstrates their expansive understanding of the challenges faced by healthcare organizations and the solutions BLG has identified for improving the patient experience and patient and business outcomes.

The bottom line is: how employees feel about leaders has a great deal to do with their own satisfaction. Creating a nurturing environment—one that supports, educates, helps, invites participation, and rewards desirable actions—should be the top agenda for any leader. First and foremost, leaders should be role models; they have to walk, talk, and live the qualities they expect from everyone else. Staying informed, being team-focused, participating with colleagues and recognizing those who support the culture goes a long way toward reaching and even exceeding goals. And, just as important, it gives employees such a sense of value that they feel part of a family they won’t want to leave.

Acknowledge during the Daily Line-Up or at Staff Meetings
  • One way that leaders serve as role models is their encouragement and recognition of  employees during the Daily Line-Up* or huddle, and at staff meetings.
  • Start each meeting with a public thank you or ask for a colleague to offer one to a team member
    Mark milestones publicly—express appreciation and thanks for the contributions of others
  • Tell stories about workplace successes
  • Be open to learning and seeking out opportunities for improvement 

*Modeled after the Ritz-Carlton best practice, the Daily Line-Up is a designated period every day when departments come together to discuss topics that reinforce the organization’s strategic areas of focus (Pillars), to recognize each other, and to stay connected as a team. 

Healthcare Rewards and Recognition TrainingBe Accountable

In addition, leaders should be accountable for reward and recognition activities in their individual areas. This is achieved by consistent reporting on the number of rewards and recognition in a given time period; regularly taking the “pulse” of staff by asking people what they like or dislike about the program; and finally, fully and completely participating as a leader. After all, the success of the organization, including reward and recognition activities, depends on leadership’s enthusiastic involvement.

Celebrate

Finally, it is incumbent upon all leaders to recognize team efforts through celebrations.

  • Recognize departments and employees by name
  • Celebrate employees who participate on service teams
  • Recognize team achievements
  • Communicate recognition to everyone through e-mail, newsletters, or communication boards
  • Find a reason to celebrate department or unit results
  • Plan a party!

Reward and Recognize Employees For...

  • A smile that’s always there
  • Hands which are willing to help
  • A creative idea
  • Consistent quality work
  • Continuous improvement
  • An extra mile effort
  • Meeting or surpassing a goal
  • A winning attitude
  • Showing support
  • Creating loyalty
  • Being cost conscious
  • Being part of the team
  • Solving a problem
  • Commitment to the customer
  • A “whatever it takes” attitude
  • Strong leadership
  • Having the vision to make it happen
  • Perseverance
  • Big dreams
  • Being fast and efficient
  • Making a commitment
  • Doing everything that’s asked and more
  • Accepting a challenge
  • Seizing an opportunity
  • Overcoming insurmountable odds
  • Doing it right the first time
  • Believing and succeeding
  • Never quitting
  • Being committed to the safety of others
  • Thinking ahead
  • Managing time wisely
  • Motivating others
  • Having superior skills and ability
  • Having the courage to push ahead
  • Outstanding  achievement
  • Making tough choices
  • Staying well-read and informed
  • Overcoming fears of failure
  • Always giving time and effort
  • Accepting responsibility
  • Perfect attendance
  • Blazing new trails
  • Demonstrating empathy toward others
  • Possessing personal integrity

Reward and Recognition Training

BLG teaches key skills, approaches, techniques, and best practices to help leaders effectively reward and recognize high performers. Elements of this training include how to harvest reward and recognition opportunities, thank you notes as a key engagement tool, formal recognition programs that support a patient focused culture, and informal methods that create a custom, individualized approach to thanking team members in your employee family.

About BLG, a HealthStream Company 

BLG provides Patient-Centered Excellence Consulting, where the patient is at the center of
everything we do. Our tools, tactics, and best practices are evidence-based and outcomes driven.  We provide custom, individualized coaching that produces measurable, sustainable increases in patient satisfaction, employee engagement, quality outcomes, and profitability.

Learn more about BLG products and services.

 

Hospitals Improve Patient Experience By Focusing on Care Quality Data

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article by HealthStream's Robin Rose, Vice President, Strategic Initatives, in the Fall 2014 issue of HealthStream's PX Advisor, our quarterly magazine focused on improving the patient experience.

HealthStream hospitals as a whole have shown substantial improvement in their survey results during the past five years. Looking across all of the items in our patient, employee, and  physician surveys, we found that our clients have significantly improved on 113 of the 123 questions. There were improvements of four points or more in 44 of the 123 areas with only three of the 123 areas showing a significant decline. Some of the most notable improvements were in the areas of emergency department operations, employee engagement, treatment of patients and families, medication information provided, and what patients should watch for upon returning home.

HealthStream PX Advisor“We are delighted to see such tremendous improvement in survey scores among our clients,” says Nicholas Dowd, Director of Consulting for HealthStream. “We work closely with each client to make sure they are focused on the right keys to improvement and that they have the tools they need to succeed. When these tools are coupled with strong leadership at the local level, we almost always see substantial improvement. It is gratifying to know that the healthy partnerships we develop with our clients bring about such positive changes in the lives of their patients.”

Some of the major findings include:

  • Patients are more satisfied than five years ago
  • Employees say they are also better off
  • Physicians note improvements in hospital performance

Data shows that the patient experience of care is being broadly improved throughout the United States. It is rewarding for both our clients and HealthStream employees to know that we are contributing to that success. As a whole, the 1,100 healthcare organizations that participate in our surveys have been able to show significant improvement in a wide variety of areas. The inevitable result must be better care for patients and their families, and a deeper sense of fulfillment for the nurses, doctors and other hospital providers who deliver this care.

However, there is still much work to do. Our ultimate goal is that every HealthStream client shows continuous improvement in the patient experience of care as measured by our patient, employee, and physician surveys. Areas to target going forward are those that have not shown significant improvement in the past five years—especially the relationships between employees and their immediate supervisors, and between physicians and hospital administrators. We at HealthStream look forward to reporting even more positive results five years from now.

 To download the full issue and article complete the form below:

Quality in Healthcare: Q&A with TeamHealth’s Chief Medical Officer

  
  
  

This blog post excerpts an article by HealthStream's Robin Rose, Vice President, Strategic Initatives, in the Fall 2014 issue of HealthStream's PX Advisor, our quarterly magazine focused on improving the patient experience. 

healthStream PX AdvisorEmergency department (ED) physicians and hospitalists have a broad impact in today’s hospitals, collectively influencing care for a high percentage of all hospital patients. As chief medical officer for TeamHealth—a Knoxville-based company that supplies outsourced emergency medicine and hospitalist services to approximately 900 civilian and military hospitals, clinics, and physician groups—Dr. Miles Snowden has a front-row seat from which to examine the many changes occurring in healthcare. For this article, we spoke with Dr. Snowden to get his perspective on what is occurring in the healthcare industry today and the implications he sees for the state of quality in our nation’s hospitals.

To begin, Dr. Snowden shares his observations on some broad changes in healthcare delivery that are having a strong influence on physicians and the way they practice. He discusses three developments in particular that are shaping the new world of the physician—all with clear repercussions on the quality of patient care that is being delivered. He then goes on to show how these changes are directly impacting the delivery of both emergency and hospital medicine.

Some of the questions he answers are:

  • From the physician’s point of view, what changes are you seeing in healthcare delivery?
  • How is the environment in the emergency department changing, given the developments you mention above?
  • What are the quality issues that keep physicians up at night?
  • How is the environment changing for hospitalists?
  • What efforts by hospitals and physicians are proving to be most effective in improving the quality of patient care?
  • What barriers do hospitals and physicians face in improving the quality of patient care?
  • What else are you seeing that is having a positive effect on quality of patient care? 

 To download the full issue and read the article, fill out the form below: 

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